Author Topic: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations  (Read 55049 times)

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #100 on: August 13, 2015, 11:08:19 pm »
i thought once a day is OD.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #101 on: September 04, 2016, 06:25:53 am »
Just a bookmark!  :angel:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #102 on: June 29, 2017, 02:26:33 am »
Thank you: valuable information  :)
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #103 on: June 30, 2017, 07:58:06 pm »
You know about 8 years ago I was on 6 mil of lolorazpan,for a year,went to hoag hospital for a 7 day detox,they cut me Right off and put me on something call nerontin? They told me it was a safe detox,I really never felt right since then,now I'm on my 3rd week of first taper from 1.05,and feeling a little better but still feel scard of everything people places and things
[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #104 on: October 25, 2017, 02:47:48 am »
Interesting list. Does anyone know why the slash '/' is used so much and inconsistently? Like w/d = withdrawal which is a single word?

In normal written language, it is hardly used at all - and if, more like a shorthand for the words 'and' and 'or'. So what's the system/rationale behind the abreviations with the slash in them?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #105 on: January 07, 2018, 03:52:28 pm »
Thanks very helpful  ( 10 yrs later)  :)
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #106 on: March 26, 2019, 12:39:38 am »
Hi

The following is a list of common abbreviations used within the medical profession and/or at BenzoBuddies. If there are some omissions, please reply to this post and we will add them to the list.

  • AC Before meals
  • b.i.d.  two times per day
  • CBC  Complete Blood Count
  • CNS Central Nervous System
  • c/o  crossover
  • c/t  cold turkey*
  • d/c discontinue
  • DP depersonalization
  • DR derealization
  • dx  diagnosis
  • GTT Drops
  • HS At bedtime
  • hx  history
  • PCG  Primary Caregiver
  • PCP  Primary Care Physician
  • PRN  as needed
  • pt  patient
  • q  every
  • q.4.h  every 4 hours
  • q.d.  once a day
  • q.h.  every hour
  • q.h.s.  Every night
  • q.i.d.  four times a day
  • rx  prescribe
  • script  prescription
  • SOB  Short Of Breath
  • sx  symptom
  • t.i.d.  three times per day
  • t.d.s. three times per day (less common alternative to t.i.d.)
  • tx  treatment
  • w/d  withdrawal
  • X times

Abbreviations are best avoided, but repeatedly using whole words and phrases can become tiresome. If you are using a medical term several times within a post, it it would be better to write something like this:

*We always advise against a c/t (cold turkey) withdrawal as it can be dangerous and counter productive. Unfortunately many come here having already attempted a c/t withdrawal.

Simply, explain the abbreviation the first time you use it within a post. ;)

what does: " DLMT " mean?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #107 on: March 26, 2019, 12:58:29 am »
DLMT = Daily Liquid Micro Taper
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Doctorspeak - common medical abbreviations
« Reply #108 on: April 03, 2019, 09:32:35 am »
With computerisation here most abbreviations are changed to full script by the PC ready for pharmacy and patients. Eg qds becomes four times a day.
Helpful post though!
I am restricting my BB time to TDS plus prn and nocte.   -)))
D
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.