Author Topic: Coping self-talk  (Read 35970 times)

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2011, 08:48:56 pm »
The list I've posted here could sound very Zen but it's not. It's a list I've compiled from my therapy sessions of many years ago. My therapist wasn't the least bit into Zen practises. Although, many Zen practices and psychosocial tools are very similar.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2011, 09:18:34 pm »
Well [...] and [...],

You are both right. And I did read that link and I can see that I already do practice many of those coping strategies.

That makes me feel better at this moment. Thank you both for trying to help anyone out there with these problems.

I am examining what has upset me today (and actually these past 2 months). I am overall wanting to be off this stuff first and foremost. Secondly, I want to be on the med that allows me to start a  titration taper. Thirdly and lastly, I want to get past these w/d sx that came on when I dropped that Xanax 12/11.

Anyway, I could go on with much discussion, but it is good to realize (through another venue i.e. that link) that i am using some of my well worn coping skills no matter how irritable and worried I get.

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2011, 09:24:04 pm »
Your reasons for being upset are absolutely valid, I know those same concerns, worries, plague most if not all of us.  But I'm really glad you are able to also see them objectively, which is a really good sign.  it also says a tremendous amount that you recognize that you have within you the ability to cope despite how difficult this is.  :)
[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2011, 09:44:43 pm »
I am well worn at coping for sure. It is part of a general survival strategy that we all have.

I see my biggest hurdle at the moment to get fully onto K and off X. Well actually it is to weather this storm of sx from the X drop. Then I can better make a decision about what to do next. I am in throes of the w/d and it is painful so each day I go back to restrategizing only to realize that I need to give myself more time to see where my sx's are as they do change from week to week. ( It will be 3 weeks since that drop on 1/11/12.)

I see myself being self-centered right here as I go on about my thought process. It is that link being played out:)

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2011, 11:58:54 pm »
I transitioned from 4 mg A to 40 V and I didn't do it well so I really empathize with your struggle.  Keep fighting the good fight, you'll get there :)

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2011, 03:28:05 am »
I do hear the short life benzos to long life benzos crossover can be tremendous struggle. I know it can be done and I will continue trying.

It's evening here right now and I feel better. Evening is often time when I either feel much better or much worse. Hard to tell the pattern if there is one. But I do know that in spite of big drop in X, K is doing something or I would have had a seizure when I made that drop as it was a 33% drop. Thought that with amount of K I was taking it would be ok. But anyway no seizure so K is working to some extent. That thought comforts me.

Thank you for all your counsel and kind words.

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2013, 12:35:28 am »
[...] - just a thought, but one of the great paradoxes of recovery is letting go of trying to "solve" anything. Problem solving and anxiety actually seem to be poor bed-fellows. The "let it come and don't fight it" attitude you probably read here is heavily influenced by Mindfulness "techniques." This doesn't mean giving in - absolutely not. It merely means staying alert to what is happening to you without being thrown into a tailspin by it. Once the problem-solving left-brain kicks in, one can easily feel defeated, as the drugs overwhelm most attempts at correcting the problem. The wise thing to do, it seems, is to "mindfully" ride it out. This means staying conscious of the withdrawal and all the feelings which come with it, including depression and anxiety. Don't try and change them; just don't give in to them. They WILL pass.

I have been through hell - just like most others here - and this technique has brought me back better than anything else. It took me a while to see it, but it really works. In fact, I think it works for depression and anxiety in general, so it's simply excellent practise.

I [...] this helps, even if you've heard it all before...

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2013, 11:42:32 am »
[...] - just a thought, but one of the great paradoxes of recovery is letting go of trying to "solve" anything. Problem solving and anxiety actually seem to be poor bed-fellows. The "let it come and don't fight it" attitude you probably read here is heavily influenced by Mindfulness "techniques." This doesn't mean giving in - absolutely not. It merely means staying alert to what is happening to you without being thrown into a tailspin by it. Once the problem-solving left-brain kicks in, one can easily feel defeated, as the drugs overwhelm most attempts at correcting the problem. The wise thing to do, it seems, is to "mindfully" ride it out. This means staying conscious of the withdrawal and all the feelings which come with it, including depression and anxiety. Don't try and change them; just don't give in to them. They WILL pass.

I have been through hell - just like most others here - and this technique has brought me back better than anything else. It took me a while to see it, but it really works. In fact, I think it works for depression and anxiety in general, so it's simply excellent practise.

I [...] this helps, even if you've heard it all before...

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2013, 07:34:56 pm »
One of my most helpful/silly things to do is sing Dory's line from Finding Nemo.
"Just keep swimming..."
 8)
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Coping self-talk
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2014, 02:17:37 pm »
The self talk helps - I repeat the items as I am doing my walk in my house every day. I also self-talk about the future - I am getting better, I have made progress, etc.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.