Author Topic: Claire Weekes  (Read 2095 times)

[Buddie]

Claire Weekes
« on: January 28, 2011, 08:51:38 pm »
Hi all,
Still taking it one day at a time. But definitely improving. Sleep is getting gradually better. Throat is still tight and distressing, but I am learning to not fear it. The following book is helping with that.
I think I mentioned before that I have found some help with the 21/7 Panic Away program. Well he credits some of his ideas to Claire Weekes, so I picked up a book by her yesterday  called, "Hope and Help for your Nerves".
I noticed that people have talked about her work before but not for over a year on the forums here.
So I thought I'd bring it up as it is really helping me learn to accept and move past my anxious fears, slowly but surely.
SO has anyone else used her work to help them with anxiety?
I know that a certain amount of my symptoms including anxiety are the product of withdrawals, but I do feel that I am adding to them and probably thereby prolonging my recovery.
On a side note, I am booking an appointment with an acupuncturist to start to help relieve my tense muscles.
-Tanya
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Claire Weekes
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2011, 11:02:46 pm »
Thanks, Tanya.  I'm a big fan of Claire Weekes' approach to lessening anxiety.  I even found some of her lectures on iTunes and downloaded them so I could listen to her instructions when I wasn't up to reading.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Claire Weekes
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2011, 11:17:20 pm »
I like Claire Weeks very much - my only question is which I have posted - is "what is the difference between Benzo Anxiety and normal every day- stress in life Anxiety?  And if we have to heal our brains in order to get rid of the symptoms of withdrawal (of which anxiety is one) then, what good does practicing what she says do IF our brains aren't healed yet.
    And [...] - I have one of her book and just got her CD "Push through Panic" - but none of them give really SPECIFIC instructions on things to do to help with the anxiety.  Do you have something different that you downloaded.  I think she is great - she describes Anxiety so perfectly -
[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Claire Weekes
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2011, 11:31:47 pm »
I like Claire Weeks very much - my only question is which I have posted - is "what is the difference between Benzo Anxiety and normal every day- stress in life Anxiety?  And if we have to heal our brains in order to get rid of the symptoms of withdrawal (of which anxiety is one) then, what good does practicing what she says do IF our brains aren't healed yet.
    And [...] - I have one of her book and just got her CD "Push through Panic" - but none of them give really SPECIFIC instructions on things to do to help with the anxiety.  Do you have something different that you downloaded.  I think she is great - she describes Anxiety so perfectly -
[...]

I don't know if what I downloaded was different from what's on her CD; I wouldn't think so.  My take away from her lectures were the benefits of facing fears and not resisting anxiety/panic but letting it wash over you, both of which lower anxiety.  Here's an excerpt from her book that describes just that:

"Sufferers of nervous illness sometimes dread the night. They lie in a bed of panic and sweat, with terrifying thoughts racing through their minds.

First, understand that your fears are terrifying only because your body is in a sensitized state, shooting off exaggerated responses, where normally you would feel perhaps no more than a vague disturbance. Your problems are not as terrible as your tired, sensitized body would have you believe. Therefore, try to see your panic for what it is, the exaggerated response of sensitized nerves and and not necessarily an expression of the magnitude of your problems. Make yourself as comfortable in bed as you can, relax to the best of your ability, then examine the feeling of panic and be prepared to let it sweep over you. Relax and go with it. Do not shrink from it or try to control it.

You will find that if you can do this, the waves of panic will settle into being a hot, sore feeling tin the pit of your stomach. You can get so used to this feeling that you can drop off to sleep with it there.

Your own thoughts may bring this panic, or it may sweep over you without apparent cause. If your thoughts are to blame, recognize that they are only thoughts; although, coming as they do so charged with fear, they may appear as monsters. Recognize that they are only thoughts and let them float away. Release them. Let them go. Do not clutch them.

When you decide to face panic and see it through, you feel some relief, and this brings its own relaxation and a certain amount of peace. I say a certain amount, because at first you may not be aware of a great change in the way you feel. Al thought there is acceptance in your mind, your body may not resound to this for a while. However, it is possible that you may be surprised at the relief you feel. This may be so great that you may find your attention wandering from yourself.

It is easy for me to say relax and accept. I know that it may be very difficult to a tense, panic-stricken person to relax, but it can be done. Remember, the panic is there only because your nerves are sensitized to it. One spasm of fear is making you more fearful of the next, so that each spasm seems more intense than the last. If you relax, analyze the spasms, and resign yourself to having them temporarily, without adding a second fear, you will develop an inner peace that will break the cycle  of spasm-panic-spasm."     
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Claire Weekes
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2011, 01:04:34 am »
I found that Claire Weekes made the acceptance of fear/anxious thoughts easier to understand than Barry McDonagh did in Panic Away. But I still walked away with a lot of help from the Panic Away program. So I would recommend that one too. I still use his seven minute meditation a couple times a day too.
I went to a restaurant with my parents for lunch today after finishing her book, and it went well. Not great, but much much better than I would have thought last week.
I just 'floated' and pretended my fears were Donald Duck. The acceptance thing is going to take some practice though. And that was what I liked about Clair Weekes book too, was that she keeps saying it will take time for you to desensitize.
I too wonder how much is withdrawal and how much is my own anxiety worsening it.
I doubt I will ever know. All I know is reading this book is helping me, and I will probably reread it a few times to make it really sink in.
-Tanya
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.