Author Topic: Diazepam question  (Read 364 times)

[Buddie]

Diazepam question
« on: January 04, 2022, 04:14:00 pm »
Hi, does anyone know when it was first discovered that Diazepam is addictive? 🤔

Many thanks
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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2022, 06:18:55 am »
Given benzo's method of action and the extensive experience with the previous class drug used for anxiety - barbiturates - which are also positive allosteric modulators of GABA A receptors, it would have been known that this new class of drug would have the same tolerance/addictive properties which were well known at the time even before the drug was approved for use.

Basically, when benzos where released they were marketed as being similar to barbiturates but with a better therapeutic index - the difference between an effective dose and a lethal dose. Barbiturates have this nasty habit of killing people if they take just a bit more than they were prescribed.

So, given the experience with barbiturates, it was well known that benzos would have tolerance and addiction issues before they were put on the market.

This pattern was repeated decades later when the first z-drugs (ambien, lunesta, etc.) were released. These drugs are chemically distinct from benzos but have the same method of action. They were sold as not having the tolerance issues of benzos, but given that they function in the same fashion anyone with a background in the subject would have known that was almost certainly not the case.

Given this history, we can fully expect a new drug in a few years that is another positive allosteric modulator of GABA A receptors and we absolutely swear this time these aren't addictive at all.





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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2022, 08:24:24 am »
Thanks [...] ☺️

Do you know when it was first printed on the leaflet that comes with Diazepam medication? I am asking because I was not aware for many years that they were addictive. I would not admit that I was addicted to them.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2022, 05:18:40 pm »
Hi, does anyone know when it was first discovered that Diazepam is addictive? 🤔
This is a good question.  When Dr. Sternbach at Hoffman-LaRoche "discovered" (his term, not mine) librium back in the late fifties, the only thing they seemed to be concerned with is that the drug be less sedating than barbiturates and less likely that the patient overdose.  He even tried it out on himself -- a common practice at one time but unheard of even by the 1950s.  I may not have the story right but he advised his colleagues if he was too sedated, that they call his wife to collect him -- which they did.  Not long after Librium  he "discovered" Valium which was a little shorter acting half-life and Laroche marketed it like crazy in 1963+.  The old ads for it - targeting women, mostly, are hysterical but, obviously, also disturbing.  One would think Barbara Gordon's  autobiographical book, "I'm Dancing As Fast as I Can"  would inform doctors and the public that physical dependency "addiction" to Valium was obvious. This may have made Hoffman LaRoche nervous enough to sell the patent for it in 1985.  I don't know.
This doesn't answer your question.  But public outcry has to be enormous for FDA to issue black box warnings as was the case in 2020 - but even so, the warning remains flawed.  I can't locate the date either the drug manufacturers or the FDA declared Valium/diazepam addictive.  If you find out, let me know.
WBB
« Last Edit: January 06, 2022, 04:44:30 am by [Buddie] »
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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2022, 05:34:43 pm »
Hey WBB, thankyou so much I am very grateful 🙏. Yes of course I will let you know if I find out. I was put on Diazepam/Valium in 2002, I wish I had a side effect leaflet from back when I first started it. I never recall reading that it was addictive 🤔..but my memory is completely messed up nowadays thanks to all these years on the medication🙄
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2022, 04:39:44 am »
Thanks [...] ☺️

Do you know when it was first printed on the leaflet that comes with Diazepam medication? I am asking because I was not aware for many years that they were addictive. I would not admit that I was addicted to them.

Unfortunately I don't know when those warnings came into existence. All I know is that your doctor should have known when he wrote you the script and he should have warned you, but he probably neglected to pass on that little tidbit of information.

I actually once had an online conversation with a doctor in a completely unrelated forum and mentioned benzo tolerance and addiction. His opinion was that if a patient became addicted to benzos that was their fault. When I pointed out that he was the one with the fancy medical degree, the letters after his name, and the state sanctioned script pad used to prescribe these drugs and that none of his patients got addicted to benzos without his assistance he literally replied "not my fault".

I've known little old ladies that went to church every Sunday that got hooked on benzos and had no idea that they could be addictive because their doctor never told them. 

Benzos are so bad that I don't even know I would label them as "potentially addictive". More like "usually addictive" in that most people that take them as prescribed for any significant amount of time will have some withdrawal symptoms and difficulty coming off them. Not everyone goes through the hell most of us here have, and a few people that won the genetic lottery can cold turkey them with no issues, but by in large most people will have some degree of difficulty quitting. Even when used exactly as prescribed by their doctor.

That really puts these drugs in a class by themselves when it comes to tolerance and addiction.

« Last Edit: January 06, 2022, 04:45:32 am by [Buddie] »
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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2022, 05:13:08 am »
I actually once had an online conversation with a doctor in a completely unrelated forum and mentioned benzo tolerance and addiction. His opinion was that if a patient became addicted to benzos that was their fault. When I pointed out that he was the one with the fancy medical degree, the letters after his name, and the state sanctioned script pad used to prescribe these drugs and that none of his patients got addicted to benzos without his assistance he literally replied "not my fault".

This disposition of doctors is still shocking.  My own brilliant, published, upper east side New York, infectious disease doctor of 20+ years said to me that she continues prescribing benzos to her patients because they "Improve their quality of life".  She was unconcerned about my Lunesta history and, to be honest, I was a little ashamed of it and never bring it up anymore. She was my on and off connection, too, for years.  Now her caseload is full of stressed out COVID long haulers.  I'm sure she prescribes them benzos all the time without regard for the 2-4 weeks recommendation.  A whole new generation of nonconsenting victims.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2022, 07:51:51 am »
Here is a pub med article from 1991......over 30 years ago....

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2051498/

and the last line says 

 great popularity, reinforcing capabilities, relatively severe withdrawal syndrome,
and reports of addiction and negative consequences of use.

I even said to my specialist Dr that they were addictive after one script which he gave me by mistake actually  :idiot:  and he said thats okay you dont have an addictive personality.... ::)    ???  and they are working well so lets stick to them :idiot:

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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2022, 09:21:11 am »
Thanks for the replies and info guys,much appreciated 😊
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[Buddie]

Re: Diazepam question
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2022, 02:21:44 pm »

I even said to my specialist Dr that they were addictive after one script which he gave me by mistake actually  :idiot:  and he said thats okay you dont have an addictive personality.... ::)    ???  and they are working well so lets stick to them :idiot:


That's really infuriating as it shows his not uncommon belief that addiction is some sort of character flaw. When it comes to benzodiazepines and z-drugs, if you take them long enough (which in some cases isn't that long at all) your brain chemistry and receptor functions are altered such that you have to get the drug just to feel normal. These are the physical organic results of this medication and have nothing whatsoever to do with whether you have an "addictive personality".

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.