Author Topic: Histamine  (Read 160 times)

[Buddie]

Histamine
« on: June 26, 2020, 09:32:26 pm »
Anyone had histamine related issues or mass cell activation?
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[Buddie]

Re: Histamine
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2020, 05:12:35 am »
Elevated histamine is commonly reported in WD. High glutamate can lead to high histamine. Many have sensitivities to food/fragrances that they didn't have before. A small amount of histamine is normally released by the stomach during digestion. Inflammation of the gut wall leads to increases in histamine. You can look up low histamine diet recommendations.
https://www.functionalnutritionanswers.com/low-histamine-diet-101-what-to-eat-what-to-avoid-and-why/

The mast cell activation is a bit harder to nail down as it's still considered "relatively rare" and somewhat difficult to diagnose. IMO it is probably more common in PAWS. Getting these folks help is not seen as a priority for insurance companies. The medical staff barely acknowledge they exist and continue to rotely prescribe.

  "Histamine is a neuromodulator of the adrenals, so elevated histamine can make the adrenals release a lot more adrenaline, instigate ‘fight or flight’ mode in the body and cause severe anxiety. There is also a strong link between histamine and sleep; having high histamine can cause insomnia. Interestingly, histamine levels naturally peak around 3am/4am, which is when many people experience cortisol spikes and unwanted adrenal activity. Sound familiar? All of these symptoms are very common in the withdrawal process, as we unfortunately know."
https://www.survivingantidepressants.org/topic/18207-antipsychotic-withdrawal-histamine/

"Glutamate to GABA Conversion"

    "Glutamate is the precurser to another neurotransmitter called GABA which has a calming effect on brain and body.  Normally glutamates will be processed in the body and create a balance of the excitatory glutamic acid and the inhibitory GABA.  People with a glutamate sensitivity have poor conversion of glutamate to GABA.

According to Dr. Jockers these individuals often need large doses of activated B6 (P-5-P) around 50 mg –
2-3 times daily and magnesium (500-1000 mg daily) to help reduce this sensitivity and improve their glutamate to GABA ratio".       https://mummyandchild.com/intolerances/glutamate/
*Please try the magnesium at very low doses initially until you know your personal tolerance.

Hope this is useful.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Histamine
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2020, 07:02:36 pm »
Yes, this helps a lot. Thank you!
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Histamine
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2020, 05:39:19 pm »
Although I have histamine issues as well I have read that valium specifically blocks the DAO enzyme which breaks down histamine... Just an FYI.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.