Author Topic: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)  (Read 1498 times)

[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #60 on: January 13, 2020, 10:14:57 pm »
"Nitric oxide is increasingly seen as an important factor in nerve degeneration (Doherty, 2011). Nitric oxide activates processes (Obukuro, et al., 2013) that can lead to cell death. Inhibiting the production of nitric oxide protects against various kinds of dementia (Sharma & Sharma, 2013; Sharma & Singh, 2013). Brain trauma causes a large increase in nitric oxide formation, and blocking its synthesis improves recovery (Hüttemann, et al., 2008; Gahm, et al., 2006). Organophosphates increase nitric oxide formation, and the protective anticholinergic drugs such as atropine reduce it (Chang, et al., 2001; Kim, et al., 1997). Stress, including fear (Campos, et al., 2013) and isolation (Zlatković & Filipović, 2013) can activate the formation of nitric oxide, and various mediators of inflammation also activate it. The nitric oxide in a person's exhaled breath can be used to diagnose some diseases, and it probably also reflects the level of their emotional well-being.
The increase of cholinesterase by enriched living serves to protect tissues against an accumulation of acetylcholine. The activation of nitric oxide synthesis by acetylcholine tends to block energy production, and to activate autolytic or catabolic processes, which are probably involved in the development of a thinner cerebral cortex in isolated or stressed animals. Breaking down acetylcholine rapidly, the tissue renewal processes are able to predominate in the enriched animals.
Environmental conditions that are favorable for respiratory energy production are protective against learned helplessness and neurodegeneration, and other biological problems that involve the same mechanisms. Adaptation to high altitude, which stimulates the formation of new mitochondria and increased thyroid (T3) activity, has been used for many years to treat neurological problems, and the effect has been demonstrated in animal experiments (Manukhina, et al., 2010). Bright light can reverse the cholinergic effects of inescapable stress (Flemmer, et al., 1990)."
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This is just an excerpt from one of the articles on Ray Peat's website.  I have heard him interviewed on the radio...and I think his take on things interesting and possibly applicable to our situation.

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"Niacinamide, like progesterone, inhibits the production of nitric oxide, and also like progesterone, it improves recovery from brain injury (Hoane, et al., 2008). In genetically altered mice with an Alzheimer's trait, niacinamide corrects the defect (Green, et al., 2008). Drugs such as atropine and antihistamines can be used in crisis situations. Bright light, without excess ultraviolet, should be available every day."

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Link to site here: http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/dark-side-of-stress-learned-helplessness.shtml

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Nitric oxide and serotonin are both neurotoxic (Joseph, et al., 1991; Skaper, et al., 1996; Parkinson, et al., 1997; Santiago, et al., 1998; Barger, et al., 2000), as a result of suppressing mitochondrial respiration. NO plays a major role in lipid peroxidation and demyelination. It's interesting to see serotonin and NO openly associated with estrogen, whose mitochondrial toxicity has been carefully hidden from public view.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 10:34:09 pm by [Buddie] »
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[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #61 on: January 14, 2020, 06:44:51 pm »
So that will be why HBOT can help.

This explains why the diazepam was probably helping my ME symptoms as well as muscle stuff.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5314655/
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #62 on: January 14, 2020, 10:06:59 pm »
Did HBOT... alot of it (30+ sessions)... didn't help.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #63 on: January 14, 2020, 11:04:48 pm »
What symptoms were you trying to treat with it?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #64 on: January 15, 2020, 06:15:02 pm »
Does this mean I should stop doing red and infrared light therapy? It's supposed to release nitric oxide. I use it for neuropathy type pain caused by withdrawal
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #65 on: January 15, 2020, 06:24:03 pm »
If it helps do it. If it makes things worse don’t. If it does neither then up to you to decide.
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[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #66 on: January 15, 2020, 08:23:59 pm »
What symptoms were you trying to treat with it?

Headaches / head pressure, fatigue.
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[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #67 on: January 16, 2020, 06:30:17 pm »
Do you have tightness at base of skull?
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[Buddie]

Re: The NO-ONOO theory of oxidative stress as the cause of disease (ML Pall)
« Reply #68 on: January 16, 2020, 08:50:51 pm »
Do you have tightness at base of skull?

No I don't... my headaches mostly radiate from temples and then I just get a strange uncomfortable sensation (the best way I can describe it) which I believe to be pressure.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.