Author Topic: thank you Colin and team and Buddies  (Read 854 times)

[Buddie]

Re: thank you Colin and team and Buddies
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2019, 12:49:12 pm »
Congratulations [...], this is great news,  thanks for the update.

Wishing you a smooth recovery

[...]  :smitten:
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[Buddie]

Re: thank you Colin and team and Buddies
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2019, 02:17:43 pm »
Congrats! would you suggest this even if you had to start off on [...] a large amount of librium? I'm on 3mg k, so that would be like 120 mgs. of librium.

Thanks. You'll see in my signature that I started at 1.8mg of Xanax. I think that's close to where you are with the K.

If you're asking about the speed of my taper, yes, a slow micro taper. I started too fast, thinking I could be off in 4-6 months (as my doctor told me). I ended up having to hold for nearly a year to get stabilized. So, yes, I recommend slowly. I would start at 5%/month daily micro taper. If that goes well, up your speed a bit the next month, perhaps to 7%. If that goes well, up your speed again the next month, perhaps to 10%. And so on. It's much better than what I did, starting super fast, crashing, and then trying to recover.

If you're asking about crossing to L, I am an ultrafast metabolizer of V, so I chose L. V is easier to micro taper because it is stable as an aqueous liquid. L is not. I have lots of notes on micro tapering L in my p-log. If you're talking about crossing in general, I found L to be very depressing, as I think is typical of the really slow benzos. It was very, very rough until I got lower on the L. That's why I continued to taper even though I was a wreck after the cross. I was trying to shake off the debilitating depression.

I think I am also an ultra-fast metabolizer of X. I had to dose 6 times/day, and it just got to be too much. My life revolved around measuring and dosing. I think a key to this is trying to make sure your life doesn't revolve around your taper. So crossing was worth it to me.

I see you reinstated after a cold turkey. If you're feeling more and more stable from the reinstatement, I would do a good long hold to make sure you're got your feet solidly under you and then start up slowly as I described. My post-hold taper was hard but much less painful than my pre-hold taper. Also, I got my ducks in a row during my hold. I made stronger social contacts (I had recently moved across the state) and learned MBSR. Highly recommend it! Just google it. There are apps that teach it now, too. Insight Timer has some MBSR body scans that are great.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2019, 02:28:36 pm by [Buddie] »
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: thank you Colin and team and Buddies
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2019, 02:25:22 pm »
Thanks, [...] and [...]!  :smitten:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: thank you Colin and team and Buddies
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2019, 02:59:35 pm »
[...]- do you have the MTHFR mutation? If so, 1 copy or 2?  You mentioned being a fast metabolized of X and V.  Does MTHFR mutation make ppl slow metabolizes of drugs or can it make one fast too?  I always associated the mutation with not being able to metabolize the drug fast enough. I have 2 copies of the mutation and I generally metabolize drugs slowly- they last longer in my body. Iíve never been tested for metabolism of drugs- just basing it on experience. Just wondering if you have any thoughts on the subject. There some hypothesis I see floating around at times that MTHFR mutation may make ppl more likely to end up dependent on meds. Any thoughts?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: thank you Colin and team and Buddies
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2019, 04:57:00 pm »
[...]- do you have the MTHFR mutation? If so, 1 copy or 2?  You mentioned being a fast metabolized of X and V.  Does MTHFR mutation make ppl slow metabolizes of drugs or can it make one fast too?  I always associated the mutation with not being able to metabolize the drug fast enough. I have 2 copies of the mutation and I generally metabolize drugs slowly- they last longer in my body. Iíve never been tested for metabolism of drugs- just basing it on experience. Just wondering if you have any thoughts on the subject. There some hypothesis I see floating around at times that MTHFR mutation may make ppl more likely to end up dependent on meds. Any thoughts?

I don't know if I have that or not. I've heard of it, but I don't understand it.

I had genetic testing done for liver enzymes. Lots of these meds are processed through the liver. I was only able to test for 2 of them, so I don't have a complete profile. I am ultrafast (same fast allele from both parents) for some meds and non-functioning (same defective allele from both parents) for others. The ultra-fast gene is fairly common. The defective gene is uncommon. I was very unlucky. I've had horrible med reactions, even life-threatening, because of this defective gene all my life but never knew the cause until I had the testing. Doctors who prescribed the meds denied they caused the reactions, of course, but now I know better.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.