Author Topic: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.  (Read 3919 times)

[Buddie]

Quote
I am a little better when I get sleep, but sleep is very challenging. Did you previously answer questions about how you are sleeping?
Just curious.

[...], hey.

Thanks again for writing, and you are very welcome. I hope you are hanging in there.  :thumbsup:

Sleep is so vital for healing, and for some of us, so hard to come by when were are in withdrawal. Early in withdrawal, sleep disintegrated into absolutely nothing for me. When I jumped after a way-to-fast-taper, I was literally getting about an hour of sleep per [...]. And this wasn't a straight hour - this was an hour collectively accumulated in desperate fragments. And not even so much my desperation, but my body's desperation. My body would literally just shutdown from the exhaustion.

It was a very slow climb back to better sleep. I suffered insomnia for many months. The first three months were the absolute worst and then the gradual improvement began. As my sleep got better, I do think the healing also improved. I refused to partake in any sleep aid aside from magnesium. And I was taking Mirtazapine which has been known to help sleep, but the doctors had jacked me so high on it, it was still activating in the early days and did not have its sleep-inducing effects.

People have talked about this elsewhere, but I really needed to practice very stringent sleep hygiene. I would take my magnesium and then I would just sit. I couldn't read at that point, my eyes and mind would not allow me to read, but if you can read, reading is great for making those eyelids droop. Reading something of a somewhat peaceful nature would be preferable. I did not watch TV or movies, screen time within two hours of bed was a big no-no. I kept my sleeping space for sleep only. And if I laid there for 20 minutes and sleep was not coming, I would get up and sit again, or do something, until I felt tired once more and I would try again.

Sleep is vital for so many reasons. I sleep less now than I did before withdrawal. I find can function at my peak with 5-6hrs of good, restorative sleep. And it is natural, unaided sleep. Sleep does come back, but it is progressive improvement and takes time. I wish you many hours deep, restorative sleep soon.

Hang in there my friend,

Dave
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Quote
I am a little better when I get sleep, but sleep is very challenging. Did you previously answer questions about how you are sleeping?
Just curious.

[...], hey.

Thanks again for writing, and you are very welcome. I hope you are hanging in there.  :thumbsup:

Sleep is so vital for healing, and for some of us, so hard to come by when were are in withdrawal. Early in withdrawal, sleep disintegrated into absolutely nothing for me. When I jumped after a way-to-fast-taper, I was literally getting about an hour of sleep per [...]. And this wasn't a straight hour - this was an hour collectively accumulated in desperate fragments. And not even so much my desperation, but my body's desperation. My body would literally just shutdown from the exhaustion.

It was a very slow climb back to better sleep. I suffered insomnia for many months. The first three months were the absolute worst and then the gradual improvement began. As my sleep got better, I do think the healing also improved. I refused to partake in any sleep aid aside from magnesium. And I was taking Mirtazapine which has been known to help sleep, but the doctors had jacked me so high on it, it was still activating in the early days and did not have its sleep-inducing effects.

People have talked about this elsewhere, but I really needed to practice very stringent sleep hygiene. I would take my magnesium and then I would just sit. I couldn't read at that point, my eyes and mind would not allow me to read, but if you can read, reading is great for making those eyelids droop. Reading something of a somewhat peaceful nature would be preferable. I did not watch TV or movies, screen time within two hours of bed was a big no-no. I kept my sleeping space for sleep only. And if I laid there for 20 minutes and sleep was not coming, I would get up and sit again, or do something, until I felt tired once more and I would try again.

Sleep is vital for so many reasons. I sleep less now than I did before withdrawal. I find can function at my peak with 5-6hrs of good, restorative sleep. And it is natural, unaided sleep. Sleep does come back, but it is progressive improvement and takes time. I wish you many hours deep, restorative sleep soon.

Hang in there my friend,

Dave

Hi Dave,

I definitely identify with only getting a non-consecutive hour of sleep a [...]! For me that lasted over a year and I thought I would die from it. I only died on the inside, I guess. Sleep only presented itself in "desperate fragments" for me as well. Beautifully worded.

Sleep is still a struggle for me and this past week I have only been able to sleep around three hours. It is making my head feel tight and pressurized and my thoughts are discombobulated and cloudy.

Having a rough week. Thank you for your words of comfort. I also want to commend you on your wonderful style of writing. Thank you for writing back!

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.