Author Topic: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.  (Read 6547 times)

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2019, 08:24:12 pm »
Hi Dave,

I only want to thank you for taking time and giving hopes and addressing everyone's questions! It's life saving to everyone still on the road.

I read all your posts in the thread. Each is tremendous helpful and encouraging ! I especially love your saying, that everything came with wd, went away along with it.

I'm so happy you made it out and got your health and life back!

Respectfully, [...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2019, 08:51:25 pm »
Oh I do have one question, did you get high sensitivity to food or anything else? If so did it resolve and how long it took?

Thanks!
[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #62 on: September 25, 2019, 10:47:29 pm »
Oh I do have one question, did you get high sensitivity to food or anything else? If so did it resolve and how long it took?

Thanks!
[...]
Thank you for your kind words [...], they mean a lot, and I appreciate you taking the time. It makes me happy that some encouragement can be gleaned from my reliving and remembering and sharing my own struggles with this process.

There was a point where I felt I was sensitive to nearly every food, supplement, even personal hygiene products like soaps and deodorants. Little by little these sensitivities lessened. The only thing that didnít come back all the way for me was my tolerance of dairy. I had given up dairy for so long that I lost much of my ability to digest it, and am now fairly lactose intolerant. I take a lactase supplement and am all-good so long as I use that prior to consuming. I still watch out for things like MSG and its relatives, but it doesnít destroy me like it did when I was in withdrawal. MSG or like substances would throw me into brutal waves.

So bottom line is most all of my sensitivities that were facets of withdrawal went away when withdrawal passed. Iíll never drink alcohol again, so canít say whether I am sensitive to that.

I hope that answers your question, at least to a degree :) Are you experiencing sensitivities to foods or supplements? If so, they will pass.

Hang in there, friend.

Dave





Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #63 on: September 26, 2019, 03:02:31 am »
Amazing, simply amazing. I don't know why I didn't see this earlier.

It's people like you who give me REAL hope. Although I believe in healing, it's difficult to see myself fully healed. I'm working on it every day, though. The anxiety is really awful, and I think it also has to do with the bp pills I'm on. They cause anxiety as side effects, and the benzo anxiety, plus the anxiety from the pills, ratchets up to a horrific level.

THANK YOU for taking the time to write your story. You indeed have been on a remarkable journey, and I am forever grateful for your words. :smitten:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #64 on: September 26, 2019, 01:02:06 pm »
Amazing, simply amazing. I don't know why I didn't see this earlier.

It's people like you who give me REAL hope. Although I believe in healing, it's difficult to see myself fully healed. I'm working on it every day, though. The anxiety is really awful, and I think it also has to do with the bp pills I'm on. They cause anxiety as side effects, and the benzo anxiety, plus the anxiety from the pills, ratchets up to a horrific level.

THANK YOU for taking the time to write your story. You indeed have been on a remarkable journey, and I am forever grateful for your words. :smitten:

[...], hello!

Thank you so much for reading and for your kind words, they are truly appreciated.

I'm sorry you are experiencing that sort of unbounded anxiety. I remember that well. It felt like those old cartoons where the mercury would rise in a thermometer until the top would start bulging and finally burst - it felt like the anxiety had no threshold at which to stop - it seemed like it was unhindered. That does go away too. Like now, if I experience some normal life anxiety, I feel that rise, but there seems to be a point where it won't go past - it doesn't feel out of control. And because of that, [...] breathe, [...] work with the thoughts, emotions, sensations, and frame the anxiety as warranted and natural, and it dissipates.

It's tough when other medications' side effects rub up against the withdrawal-related anxiety. But as that withdrawal-related anxiety settles, any side effect-induced anxiety will be more tolerable.

Hang in there and keep up the good work! :)

Dave
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #65 on: September 26, 2019, 08:12:14 pm »
Hi dave,
Thank you for you kind reply with all the detailed info!

Yes, I developed extreme sensitivity 1 month after jumping to almost everything. First to msg and artificial sweeteners, all supplement or over the counter meds, then various food including all wheat products, sugars, some fruit like berries, grapes, plums, vegetables all beans, spinach, tomatoes, and many others [...]'t remember. Even with the very limited food items, I would feel some sx ramps up although not severe like those ones making me passing out, or causing heart issues, breathing issues and others. Even the topical creams for wd rashes made me breathless. I have to eat small meals at a time to avoid the spike of the glutamate level which I believe the cause of problems.

I'm so glad to know it went away for you over time.

Best wishes
[...]

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Realize the strength, move on.
« Reply #66 on: September 26, 2019, 08:49:23 pm »
Amazing, simply amazing. I don't know why I didn't see this earlier.

It's people like you who give me REAL hope. Although I believe in healing, it's difficult to see myself fully healed. I'm working on it every day, though. The anxiety is really awful, and I think it also has to do with the bp pills I'm on. They cause anxiety as side effects, and the benzo anxiety, plus the anxiety from the pills, ratchets up to a horrific level.

THANK YOU for taking the time to write your story. You indeed have been on a remarkable journey, and I am forever grateful for your words. :smitten:

[...], hello!

Thank you so much for reading and for your kind words, they are truly appreciated.

I'm sorry you are experiencing that sort of unbounded anxiety. I remember that well. It felt like those old cartoons where the mercury would rise in a thermometer until the top would start bulging and finally burst - it felt like the anxiety had no threshold at which to stop - it seemed like it was unhindered. That does go away too. Like now, if I experience some normal life anxiety, I feel that rise, but there seems to be a point where it won't go past - it doesn't feel out of control. And because of that, [...] breathe, [...] work with the thoughts, emotions, sensations, and frame the anxiety as warranted and natural, and it dissipates.

It's tough when other medications' side effects rub up against the withdrawal-related anxiety. But as that withdrawal-related anxiety settles, any side effect-induced anxiety will be more tolerable.

Hang in there and keep up the good work! :)

Dave

THANK YOU SO MUCH, Dave!!!! You explained my anxiety perfectly. At this point [...] only dream of the benzo anxiety leaving, but the fact that you said it reaches a point that it won't go past is music to my ears!! I'm SO looking forward to that.

And I'm SO HAPPY that you finally have your life back and are truly living once again. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Hi Dave,

I forgot to ask earlier if you had any issues with cognitive impairment after your withdrawals? Memory problems? Concentration problems? Problems with learning and processing new information? Any problems with language (word recall or putting together sentences)? Access to your creative mind?

Cognitive impairment has become my fundamental issue at 2 years off and I am curious if these were ever issues with you or others.

Thank you so much for your consideration.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Hi Dave,

I forgot to ask earlier if you had any issues with cognitive impairment after your withdrawals? Memory problems? Concentration problems? Problems with learning and processing new information? Any problems with language (word recall or putting together sentences)? Access to your creative mind?

Cognitive impairment has become my fundamental issue at 2 years off and I am curious if these were ever issues with you or others.

Thank you so much for your consideration.

[...], hi.

Thank you for your question, thank you for writing.

Cognitive impairment during withdrawal itself was truly catastrophic - for me at least. I'd always held a certain sense of pride in my organizational skills and memory. During withdrawal, I honestly could not tell you who the president was at that time, I called people I knew for ages by the wrong name, or couldn't place their names at all. I rarely knew the day of the week. I had issues with processing any new information, finding words, and any creativity I had was absolutely gone in that period.

I was so scared about what was happening in my mind that I sat down with a pad and paper one day and wrote down any passwords I could recall for utilities, bank accounts, etc. as I was the principal bill payer and organizer in my household and I could feel very quickly that I was losing my ability to recall things and hold on to a sense of order.

The cognitive issues were at their worst for the first year, and even where you are at 2 years off, it was not great, but was getting somewhat better. It was a gradual sense of coming back online cognitively. Now 7 years off, my memory and organizational skills, my creativity, my ability to make decisions, they have all returned full-force. But memory from my withdrawal is sparse. I always think of it as my life on a video reel - the period of withdrawal was recorded in a very fragmented, broken way. So if you were you to sit down and watch the DVD of my life, the period of withdrawal is fraught with skips, stutters, and blank space - until healing had gained a foothold and the movie of my human lifetime returned.

I hope this helps. Hang in there my friend.

Dave
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Hi Dave,

I forgot to ask earlier if you had any issues with cognitive impairment after your withdrawals? Memory problems? Concentration problems? Problems with learning and processing new information? Any problems with language (word recall or putting together sentences)? Access to your creative mind?

Cognitive impairment has become my fundamental issue at 2 years off and I am curious if these were ever issues with you or others.

Thank you so much for your consideration.

[...], hi.

Thank you for your question, thank you for writing.

Cognitive impairment during withdrawal itself was truly catastrophic - for me at least. I'd always held a certain sense of pride in my organizational skills and memory. During withdrawal, I honestly could not tell you who the president was at that time, I called people I knew for ages by the wrong name, or couldn't place their names at all. I rarely knew the day of the week. I had issues with processing any new information, finding words, and any creativity I had was absolutely gone in that period.

I was so scared about what was happening in my mind that I sat down with a pad and paper one day and wrote down any passwords I could recall for utilities, bank accounts, etc. as I was the principal bill payer and organizer in my household and I could feel very quickly that I was losing my ability to recall things and hold on to a sense of order.

The cognitive issues were at their worst for the first year, and even where you are at 2 years off, it was not great, but was getting somewhat better. It was a gradual sense of coming back online cognitively. Now 7 years off, my memory and organizational skills, my creativity, my ability to make decisions, they have all returned full-force. But memory from my withdrawal is sparse. I always think of it as my life on a video reel - the period of withdrawal was recorded in a very fragmented, broken way. So if you were you to sit down and watch the DVD of my life, the period of withdrawal is fraught with skips, stutters, and blank space - until healing had gained a foothold and the movie of my human lifetime returned.

I hope this helps. Hang in there my friend.

Dave

Hi Dave,
Thank you very much to take time to reflect and write back to me. It means the world. I would have written sooner, but you know how it is...finding the cognitive energy can be challenging!

I find connection in your description of your challenges and I do know that I have improved over the course of my prolonged withdrawal. It was weird how I actually got cognitively worse after the acute stage and I could sense my brain closing in on itself and disconnecting as if my neurons were all closing up. Not much messengering going on and I was in haze and a bubble. It was very hard to communicate and if I did manage to find words they were sparse.

I have steadily improved since then, but it has taken a long time. My conversations now are often self-conscious, stilted and question-oriented as I find it hard to follow through with thoughts. I think because my memory is still so impaired it is hard to pull thoughts to put into conversation, etc.

I am a little better when I get sleep, but sleep is very challenging. Did you previously answer questions about how you are sleeping?
Just curious.
 
All the best to you and I appreciate you very much!

[...]

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.