Author Topic: Home for Christmas  (Read 2037 times)

[Buddie]

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[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2018, 08:21:36 pm »
Mais oui, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsTVcbdZCH0 is a personal favorite.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2018, 03:36:27 pm »
Thank you for posting some Christmas cheer, even though I do not feel so well, I do like to listen to the Christmas music.

[...]  :smitten:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2018, 02:45:17 pm »
Moscow Chamber Choir

Колядки
Carols
   
Novokuznetsk Spiritual Seminary Choir

Дева сына породила
A Virgin Bore a Son
   
Novokuznetsk Spiritual Seminary Choir

Радуйтеся вси Люде
Rejoice All Ye People
   
Novokuznetsk Spiritual Seminary Choir

Нова радість стала
New Joy Has Come
   

Hymn of the Cherubim

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
   
   
   
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2018, 05:17:33 am »
The Gregg Smith Singers

The Boar's Head Carol
     
A macaronic 15th-century English Christmas carol
describing the ancient tradition of sacrificing a boar
and presenting its head at a Yuletide feast.
Of the several extant versions of the carol,
the one most often performed today is based on
a version published in 1521 in Wynkyn de Worde's
Christmasse Carolles. Wikipedia
     
The Clare College Singers

Here We come A-Wassailing
     
A traditional English Christmas carol and New Year song, c. 1850,
about 'wassailing', or singing carols door to door, wishing good health,
in return for food and alcoholic drink. The song's refrain is very well known:

Love and joy come to you,
And to you your wassail too;
And God bless you and send you a Happy New Year
And God send you a Happy New Year.

     
The Waverly Consort &
The Choir of King's College, Cambridge


The Gloucester Wassail
The Holly and the Ivy
     

The word wassail comes from Old English was hál, meaning "be hale"—i.e., "be healthy". 
The Gloucestershire Wassail dates back to the Middle Ages:
 
Wassail! wassail! all over the town,
Our toast it is white and our ale it is brown;
Our bowl it is made of the white maple tree;
With the wassailing bowl, we'll drink unto thee.


The Holly and the Ivy is a traditional British folk Christmas carol.

The Robert Shaw Chorale

I Saw Three Ships

"I Saw Three Ships (Come Sailing In)" is a traditional and popular Christmas carol from England. The earliest printed version is from the 17th century, possibly Derbyshire, and was also published by William Sandys in 1833. The lyrics speak of the ships sailing into Bethlehem, but the nearest body of water is the Dead Sea about 20 miles away. Most likely the ships are actually the camels used by the Magi, as camels are frequently referred to as "ships of the desert". Wikipedia
The Robert Shaw Chorale

God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen

A traditional English Christmas carol, also known as Tidings of Comfort and Joy, and by variant incipits as Come All You Worthy Gentlemen, God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen, God Rest Ye, Merry Christians, or God Rest You Merry People All. One of the oldest extant carols, it dates to the 16th century or earlier. The earliest known printed edition of the carol is in a broadsheet dated to c. 1760. The traditional English melody is in the minor mode; the earliest printed edition of the melody appears to be in a parody, in the 1829 Facetiae of William Hone. Wikipedia
The Robert Shaw Chorale

Coventry Carol

A 16th-century English Christmas carol traditionally performed in Coventry as part of a mystery play called The Pageant of the Shearmen and Tailors, depicting the Massacre of the Innocents, in which Herod ordered all male infants under the age of two in Bethlehem to be killed, it takes the form of a lullaby sung by mothers of the doomed children. Author unknown. Oldest known text by Robert Croo in 1534; oldest known musical setting dates from 1591. Wikipedia

Amor Artis Chorale
Johannes Somary, Cond.

A Baroque Christmas
     


These tunes are 300-400 years old and very beautiful.
It's a complete album, 52 minutes long, so start it and
go about your business while it plays in the background.

You'll want to roast a turkey, bake cookies,
and decorate a tree, guaranteed.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2018, 11:39:24 pm »

Three very different settings of the Ave Maria


Tatiana Ivashchenko & Choir

by Franz Schubert

Composed by Franz Schubert in 1825 as part of his Opus 52, a setting of seven songs from Walter Scott's popular epic poem The Lady of the Lake, the opening words and refrain of Ellen's song, namely Ave Maria may have led to the idea of adapting Schubert's melody as a setting for the full text of the traditional Roman Catholic prayer "Ave Maria". The Latin version of the "Ave Maria" is now so frequently used with Schubert's melody that it has led to the misconception that he originally wrote the melody as a setting for the "Ave Maria". But considering that the original lyrics are also a prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it was not really far-fetched to set the traditional Latin prayer to this same music.

Originally published in 1853 as Méditation sur le Premier Prélude de Piano de S. Bach, the piece consists of a melody by the French Romantic composer Charles Gounod superimposed over a slightly changed version of the Prelude No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, from Book I of J.S. Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, written 137 years earlier.
Senior Boy Choir of the Pioneer School

by V. Vavilov / G. Caccini

Composed by Soviet-era Russian composer Vladimir Vavilov around 1970, Vavilov himself originally ascribed the authorship of this music to  "Anonymous". It is believed that organist Mark Shakhin, one of the performers on the "Melodiya" LP, first ascribed the work to the 17th-century Italian composer Giulio Caccini after Vavilov's death, and gave the "newly-discovered scores" to other musicians. The organist Oleg Yanchenko then made an arrangement of the aria for a recording by Irina Arkhipova in 1987, after which the piece came to be famous worldwide. It seems likely that this piece was an original composition by Vavilov, and has nothing at all to do with Caccini. (For a similarly strange authorship mystery, see Albinoni's Adagio.)
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Home for Christmas
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2018, 05:45:21 am »
    La Cantique de Noël
Roberto Alagna


Minuit, chrétiens, c'est l'heure solennelle,
Où l'Homme Dieu descendit jusqu'à nous
Pour effacer la tache originelle
Et de Son Père arrêter le courroux.
Le monde entier tressaille d'espérance
En cette nuit qui lui donne un Sauveur.

Peuple à genoux, attends ta délivrance.
Noël, Noël, voici le Rédempteur,
Noël, Noël, voici le Rédempteur!

Le Rédempteur a brisé toute entrave:
La terre est libre, et le ciel est ouvert.
Il voit un frère où n'était qu'un esclave,
L'amour unit ceux qu'enchaînait le fer.
Qui lui dira notre reconnaissance,
C'est pour nous tous qu'il naît,
qu'il souffre et meurt.

Peuple debout! Chante ta délivrance,
Noël, Noël, chantons le Rédempteur,
Noël, Noël, chantons le Rédempteur!

   Nat King Cole


O holy night! The stars are brightly shining,
It is the night of our dear Saviour's birth.
Long lay the world in sin and error pining,
'Til He appear'd and the soul felt its worth.
A thrill of hope, the weary world rejoices,
For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn.

Fall on your knees! O hear the angel voices!
O night divine, O night when Christ was born;
O night divine, O night, O night Divine.

Led by the light of Faith serenely beaming,
With glowing hearts by His cradle we stand.
So led by light of a star sweetly gleaming,
Here came the wise men from the Orient land.
The King of Kings lay thus in lowly manger;
In all our trials born to be our friend.

He knows our need, to our weaknesses no stranger,
Behold your King! Before Him lowly bend!
Behold your King, Before Him lowly bend!

At the end of the year 1843 in Roquemaure, France, the church organ was renovated.
To celebrate the event, the parish priest asked Placide Cappeau, a wine merchant and
poet from Roquemaure, to write a Christmas poem. Although he was a professed atheist
and anticlerical, Cappeau agreed to the request. Cappeau claimed he wrote the poem in
a stagecoach to Paris, between Mâcon and Dijon; but more likely, he wrote it in the usual
way. He called the poem "Minuit, chrétiens" - that is: Midnight, Christians.
Soon after, French composer Adolphe Adam set the poem to music. Adam said he considered
his tune "la Marseillaise religieuse"(the religious Marseillaise) because of the republican -
and even somewhat socialist - views of Cappeau, which are evident in the poem. The finished
song, called "La Cantique de Noël", was premiered in Roquemaure in 1847 on Christmas Eve
during the midnight Mass by Emily Laurey, a singer who had worked previously with Adolphe
Adam in light opera. In 1855, Bostonian John Sullivan Dwight, a minister and music journal editor,
translated the song into English as "O Holy Night".

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.