Author Topic: Antidepressant Withdrawal  (Read 46903 times)

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2015, 10:52:02 am »
I have a question, do you think AD recovery is slower than benzo?
I don't really like survivingantidepressants but it seems to have a lot of +5 years members and that is very scary.
With benzo's we all say: 18 months, how is this for AD? Are these protracted members a minority but vocally active or are there much more protracted members than here  :-[
I'm starting to think benzo's is not my worst problem but probably my 5-HT receptors are, because everything I took has an effect on these receptors

That's a good question and one that I've been thinking about myself over the past 2.5 years since I came off my last AD.

There's evidence of a chronic condition that may develop called tardive dysphoria. Here's an article in Psychology Today about it in layman's terms:

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria.

Some researchers and doctors refer to this chronic condition as tardive akthisia, which is how Dr. Shipko explains it:

With the SSRIs, it is not so much a tardive movement disorder as a tardive problem with akathisia, a sort of constant restlessness or agitation that is accompanied by an agitated anxious/depressed state. The full article is here: Playing the Odds: Antidepressant ‘Withdrawal’ and the Problem of Informed Consent

While Dr. Shipko definitely paints a bleak picture, keep in mind there is NO research for the long term outcome of people who quit these drugs.  And Dr. Shipko is much more likely to see the worst of the worst (as are web forums, by the way) simply because the majority of people DO heal in time and move away from doctors and web forums.

I think what you're seeing on SA is this chronic condition that does affect a minority of people who come off of ADs.

That's why it's important to do a slow taper, learn to distract, and do as much self care as possible because for some of us, it will take a number of years for complete healing to occur.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2015, 11:27:39 am »
I have a question, do you think AD recovery is slower than benzo?
I don't really like survivingantidepressants but it seems to have a lot of +5 years members and that is very scary.
With benzo's we all say: 18 months, how is this for AD? Are these protracted members a minority but vocally active or are there much more protracted members than here  :-[
I'm starting to think benzo's is not my worst problem but probably my 5-HT receptors are, because everything I took has an effect on these receptors

That's a good question and one that I've been thinking about myself over the past 2.5 years since I came off my last AD.

There's evidence of a chronic condition that may develop called tardive dysphoria. Here's an article in Psychology Today about it in layman's terms:

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria.

Some researchers and doctors refer to this chronic condition as tardive akthisia, which is how Dr. Shipko explains it:

With the SSRIs, it is not so much a tardive movement disorder as a tardive problem with akathisia, a sort of constant restlessness or agitation that is accompanied by an agitated anxious/depressed state. The full article is here: Playing the Odds: Antidepressant ‘Withdrawal’ and the Problem of Informed Consent

While Dr. Shipko definitely paints a bleak picture, keep in mind there is NO research for the long term outcome of people who quit these drugs.  And Dr. Shipko is much more likely to see the worst of the worst (as are web forums, by the way) simply because the majority of people DO heal in time and move away from doctors and web forums.

I think what you're seeing on SA is this chronic condition that does affect a minority of people who come off of ADs.

That's why it's important to do a slow taper, learn to distract, and do as much self care as possible because for some of us, it will take a number of years for complete healing to occur.

But do you think everyone heals? I cold turkeyed too much so I'm very severe , and very scared. I know it will take years for me, but I need to believe it will happen otherwise I see no use in this :( I know that they only follow patients during a fix amount of years, so maybe some take 10 years for example and they say it's permanent because they did not check after these 10 years?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2015, 01:15:04 pm »
I have a question, do you think AD recovery is slower than benzo?
I don't really like survivingantidepressants but it seems to have a lot of +5 years members and that is very scary.
With benzo's we all say: 18 months, how is this for AD? Are these protracted members a minority but vocally active or are there much more protracted members than here  :-[
I'm starting to think benzo's is not my worst problem but probably my 5-HT receptors are, because everything I took has an effect on these receptors

That's a good question and one that I've been thinking about myself over the past 2.5 years since I came off my last AD.

There's evidence of a chronic condition that may develop called tardive dysphoria. Here's an article in Psychology Today about it in layman's terms:

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria.

Some researchers and doctors refer to this chronic condition as tardive akthisia, which is how Dr. Shipko explains it:

With the SSRIs, it is not so much a tardive movement disorder as a tardive problem with akathisia, a sort of constant restlessness or agitation that is accompanied by an agitated anxious/depressed state. The full article is here: Playing the Odds: Antidepressant ‘Withdrawal’ and the Problem of Informed Consent

While Dr. Shipko definitely paints a bleak picture, keep in mind there is NO research for the long term outcome of people who quit these drugs.  And Dr. Shipko is much more likely to see the worst of the worst (as are web forums, by the way) simply because the majority of people DO heal in time and move away from doctors and web forums.

I think what you're seeing on SA is this chronic condition that does affect a minority of people who come off of ADs.

That's why it's important to do a slow taper, learn to distract, and do as much self care as possible because for some of us, it will take a number of years for complete healing to occur.

But do you think everyone heals? I cold turkeyed too much so I'm very severe , and very scared. I know it will take years for me, but I need to believe it will happen otherwise I see no use in this :( I know that they only follow patients during a fix amount of years, so maybe some take 10 years for example and they say it's permanent because they did not check after these 10 years?

Oh yes - check out this video by Dr. Norman Doidge - Dr Norman Doidge , The Brain That Changes Itself

There's a lot of research in the neuroplasticity of the brain pointing to complete healing from even "structural" damage, which is very powerful information.

Here's the PDF version of his book The Brain that Changes Itself.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2015, 01:17:18 pm »
I have a question, do you think AD recovery is slower than benzo?
I don't really like survivingantidepressants but it seems to have a lot of +5 years members and that is very scary.
With benzo's we all say: 18 months, how is this for AD? Are these protracted members a minority but vocally active or are there much more protracted members than here  :-[
I'm starting to think benzo's is not my worst problem but probably my 5-HT receptors are, because everything I took has an effect on these receptors

That's a good question and one that I've been thinking about myself over the past 2.5 years since I came off my last AD.

There's evidence of a chronic condition that may develop called tardive dysphoria. Here's an article in Psychology Today about it in layman's terms:

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name: Tardive Dysphoria.

Some researchers and doctors refer to this chronic condition as tardive akthisia, which is how Dr. Shipko explains it:

With the SSRIs, it is not so much a tardive movement disorder as a tardive problem with akathisia, a sort of constant restlessness or agitation that is accompanied by an agitated anxious/depressed state. The full article is here: Playing the Odds: Antidepressant ‘Withdrawal’ and the Problem of Informed Consent

While Dr. Shipko definitely paints a bleak picture, keep in mind there is NO research for the long term outcome of people who quit these drugs.  And Dr. Shipko is much more likely to see the worst of the worst (as are web forums, by the way) simply because the majority of people DO heal in time and move away from doctors and web forums.

I think what you're seeing on SA is this chronic condition that does affect a minority of people who come off of ADs.

That's why it's important to do a slow taper, learn to distract, and do as much self care as possible because for some of us, it will take a number of years for complete healing to occur.

But do you think everyone heals? I cold turkeyed too much so I'm very severe , and very scared. I know it will take years for me, but I need to believe it will happen otherwise I see no use in this :( I know that they only follow patients during a fix amount of years, so maybe some take 10 years for example and they say it's permanent because they did not check after these 10 years?

Oh yes - check out this video by Dr. Norman Doidge - Dr Norman Doidge , The Brain That Changes Itself

There's a lot of research in the neuroplasticity of the brain pointing to complete healing from even "structural" damage, which is very powerful information.

Here's the PDF version of his book The Brain that Changes Itself.

Thank you! I look up to you because you also had so many meds from a young age. And feel you can relate.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2015, 07:12:02 pm »
Thank you SO MUCH Mind  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

...actually this is scary: the Ashton Manual advocates staying on ADs when withdrawing from benzos (4mg K + 10mg V is what I need to get off  :sick:) ...but there is the opposite view which states ADs should go first as they are more "activating"?

It gets very confusing  :D
Additionally I don't understand my ADs which are both said to make me drowsy too (Venlafaxine and Escitalopram)... I'm not expecting answers of course, just saying that being polydrugged really sucks  >:(

Good luck, all!!
« Last Edit: November 16, 2015, 10:41:04 am by [Buddie] »
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2015, 03:28:56 am »

Thank you so much!!  I'm going to print out this information. I wish I had this when I was getting off my meds.
[...].
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2016, 02:22:20 am »
the AW for most of us on them is a nightmare, reading all the post there is some great help out there and i have read on other sites a big put down for the program ..the way back...i can only speak for myself at this point in time but it worked for me....took 6 months ...after being on zoloft for 25 years and up to 3 x 100mg tab a day in the final days , trying to get off it and couple of times was worse then the symptoms that put me on it...i was going through major trauma which i dont wish to talk about at this stage....anyway, i tried so hard to get off it then after research on line found the ..road back program...having teamed up with a personal trainer and a chap studying to be a  naturopath , they looked into the supplements and were amazed at the type mix and where it came from, now im not saying you cant get the same thing but remember so much in life is ..you get what you pay for...it has worked for me and i would only suggest to others take at least high dose multi vit B , and never give up you can get there even if it takes awhile, i have never felt better in many many years....and not sure if alot of you where you are reading this will be able to obtain medical marijuana but i have heard this helps soooooo much with the withdrawals also, im not saying get high im saying use stuff that just eases the withdrawals...im told it helps with the neuro transmitters in the brain...think about it and it will make sense, i hope all of you who are trying to withdraw hang in there , it will happen sometimes not as quick as you may want but it will happen, ...oh and just another thing for those that put weight on....IT COMES OFF when you get of this stuff, amazing i cant believe my eating has gone back to what it was pre Z...its hard to believe sometimes just what and how much we are eating...good luck everyone, remember YOU CAN DO IT :thumbsup:     
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2016, 01:59:17 pm »
If I had read these lists and have found those books 5 years ago!!!! But - I came to the same resolution..but for what price..
Thanks a lot for this post!
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2016, 03:15:10 am »
 Harm Reduction Guide to Coming Off Psychiatric Drugs

Okay, I read the above in the sticky "antidepressant withdrawal" post above and two ideas seemed interesting.

First, they have a different version of the 10% taper. Instead of continuing to taper 10% from each previous dose, they taper 10% off the original dose until they get halfway from the original and then they taper 10% each time from that halfway point. That way they are doing bigger cuts.

Also, in at least two sections, they mention that in some cases it might not be the best thing to completely eliminate the drug, instead cut down to the lowest dose possible. This does not allow for tolerance, but I do kind of like the idea that a person not force themself off of a drug when it just might be possible they will be worse off without it. You don't hear too much about that, it seems to be all or nothing. I'd hate to see a person withdraw themselves completely of ADs or any drug for that matter and get so depressed they kill themselves. By then, the point of whether the drug is harmful or not is moot.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Antidepressant Withdrawal
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2017, 07:28:08 pm »
Thanks for this post & so glad I found it.
I'm tapering off 10 years of using klonopin.  I'm at a .25 taper for 2 week, then half that for 2 more weeks.  Not easy at all and I've been driving myself crazy as my Dr prescribed Lexapro 10mg to help come off the K.  I've only used it for 2 months, and wondered if I should stop or taper that too?  After reading this, I think I will finish tapering with the Benzo, then deal with the AD.
Please PM if you think this is wrong.
Thx so much
Good luck to all
xoxo
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.