Author Topic: Glutamate Blockers  (Read 2026 times)

[Buddie]

Glutamate Blockers
« on: April 29, 2014, 05:30:48 pm »
I just posted this info for an FYI, it's interesting.  Most of this data is not from benzo research since benzo withdrawal research is non-existent.

Memantine: An anti-glutamate drug

"Memantine is an anti-glutamate and energy-buffering drug. As an NMDA antagonist, memantine prevents the neurotransmitter glutamate from leading to nerve cell degeneration by inhibiting glutamate´s binding to the receptor. Memantine has been clinically used to treat dementia and Alzheimer´s disease. Current research on its effects in other diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including HD, looks promising because memantine appears to be well-tolerated as well as beneficial in terms of learning facilitation. It is possible that memantine may even be able to disrupt the progression of HD.

"According to a theory known as the excitotoxicity theory, lower energy levels in the nerve cells of people with HD cause them to be overly sensitive to glutamate. Consequently, even normal levels of glutamate can overactivate the glutamate receptors on the nerve cells. When these receptors (also known as NMDA receptors) are activated, calcium ions enter the nerve cells. Excessive activation causes a buildup of these calcium ions, which then leads to the death of the nerve cell....

"HD researchers believe that memantine may have strong potential to slow the progression of HD by decreasing the NMDA receptor´s sensitivity to glutamate. Memantine is an NMDA antagonist. As an antagonist, memantine prevents the excessive binding of glutamate to NMDA receptors, inhibiting the pathway to excessive NMDA activation and nerve cell death. Memantine is also a non-competitive antagonist. "Non-competitive" means that memantine binds to a site on the NMDA receptor that is different from glutatmate´s binding site. By binding to one portion of the NMDA receptor, memantine changes the overall shape of the receptor, making it more difficult for glutamate to bind to the other portion of the receptor."

-- (HOPES: Huntington's Outreach Project for Education, at Stanford,  5/3/2005: http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/treatmts/antiglut/l5.html)
 
Riluzole: An anti-glutamate drug and energy buffer.

"Riluzole has been shown to have energy-buffering and anti-glutamate properties. It has been associated with increased energy metabolism efficiency and inhibition of glutamate activity, and is currently used as a treatment for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) .... as well as Huntington’s disease...."

Riluzole is used to deal with the problem of aerobic inefficiency. "Energy metabolism is the process by which cells produce energy. Normally, cells prefer a form  energy metabolism called aerobic respiration due to its efficiency and high-energy yield. The altered huntingtin protein in people with HD is believed to interfere with aerobic respiration, resulting in the inability of HD cells to perform aerobic respiration efficiently. Instead, HD cells must resort to anaerobic respiration, another form of energy metabolism that is less efficient. This impairment in energy metabolism results in various negative effects that eventually lead to cell death.

"Studies have reported that riluzole treatment improves motor abnormalities associated with administration of a toxin that blocks energy metabolism. The improvements indicate that riluzole may have positive effects on cells with defective metabolism. However, the mechanism by which riluzole improves energy metabolism is still unknown....

Riluzole is also used to deal with the problem of glutamate sensitivity. "One of the effects of the impairment in energy metabolism in HD cells is an increased sensitivity to glutamate. Glutamate is one of the major neurotransmitters in the nervous system, used to transmit messages from nerve cell to another. Increased activation of receptors that receive glutamate has been observed in people with HD. Increased glutamate activity, in turn, has been associated with nerve cell death.

"Studies have demonstrated that riluzole may act as an anti-glutamate drug in two ways: 1) by inhibiting the release of glutamate and 2) by interfering with the effects of glutamate on nerve cells.

"It is thought that riluzole inhibits the release of glutamate by interfering with sodium ([...]+) channels that are required for normal glutamate release."

-- (HOPES: Huntington's Outreach Project for Education, at Stanford, 12/3/2004: http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/treatmts/antiglut/l3.html)

Lamotrigine - An anti-glutamate and anticonvulsant drug

"Lamotrigine belongs to a group of medications called anticonvulsants, which are used to control seizure disorders. Lamotrigine acts on the central nervous system to control the number and severity of seizures. It is thought to suppress the activity of certain parts of the brain and the abnormal firing of nerve cells that cause seizures. In psychiatry, lamotrigine may be used as a mood stabilizer. In the laboratory, researchers have found that lamotrigine also inhibits release of the neurotransmitter glutamate. This is important because glutamate may play a role in nerve cell degeneration in the brains of people with HD, so reducing the amount of glutamate released makes lamotrigine a potential treatment for HD."
-- (HOPES: Huntington's Outreach Project for Education, at Stanford, 6/24/05: http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/treatmts/antiglut/l4.html)

 Budipine

Budipine and Other Glutamate Blockers. A number of experimental drugs are being investigated for Parkinsons disease because they block the actions of glutamate, an amino acid that is a particularly potent nerve cell killer. Some of these drugs block a receptor group to glutamate called N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Investigative NMDA antagonists include remacemide, memantine, riluzole, and budipine. Budipine is of particular interest. It not only blocks NMDA, but it increases levels of two enzymes involved in the production of dopamine. Studies suggest that it reduces tremor in PD and it proving to be beneficial in combination with levodopa.

-- (About.com, 3/12/06): http://adam.about.com/reports/000051_7.htm)

Gabapentin

"Gabapentin - [Brand Name: Neurotin] is a FDA approved medication for the treatment of seizures (epilepsy). Gabapentin is thought to decrease the production of glutamate. Glutamate is an excitatory amino acid in the brain. It acts as the major excitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, in excessive amounts, is toxic to motor neurons. Studies have shown that ALS patients have high levels of glutamate in their brain as well as a defect in the glutamate transport mechanism. Gabapentin is hoped to slow the rate of motor neuron death. A small number of patients on gabapentin report decreased muscle spasms and/or decreased muscle fasciculations and improved sleep."

--(The University of Miami ALS Clinical and Research Center: http://www.miami-als.org/drugs.htm)
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2014, 10:26:19 pm »
..I'll pass on any other drugs..
how about cream of tartar?
[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2021, 07:31:33 pm »
Sorry but nobody is going to be taking harmful drugs to block glutamate and increase our neurological damage, we are looking for natural ways to do it.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2021, 12:53:42 pm »
Sorry but nobody is going to be taking harmful drugs to block glutamate and increase our neurological damage, we are looking for natural ways to do it.

Scooby, your use of the word "nobody" is highly judgmental and just plain wrong. A close friend of mine died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). It is a terrible way to die. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis

He was an educator and a musician. He tried nearly every imaginable treatment (natural and pharmacological). Before his death while taking a pharmacological medication to prolong his painful existence and with the use of computer assisted technology to transcribe and publish most of his songs, he found some solace and also brought enjoyment to many of his friends who had not heard his previously unpublished music.

imo, people should be free to experiment and treat their symptoms of distress as they see fit so long as they do no harm to others.
best wishes

Edit: Another case in point; Jason Becker who can no longer perform due to ALS but, he is still composing music:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8G1dV-STh8
 
« Last Edit: December 29, 2021, 01:16:39 pm by [Buddie] »
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2021, 05:22:14 pm »
People should be informed of the consequences of pharmaceutical drugs to treat glutamate overload especially those in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The drugs used for glutamate blocking cause severe side effects and withdrawal symptoms like benzodiazepines, this is not something others with damaged nervous systems want.



Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2022, 06:53:06 am »
People should be informed of the consequences of pharmaceutical drugs to treat glutamate overload especially those in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The drugs used for glutamate blocking cause severe side effects and withdrawal symptoms like benzodiazepines, this is not something others with damaged nervous systems want.

How is it that you speak for anyone besides yourself?

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2022, 04:15:12 pm »
People should be informed of the consequences of pharmaceutical drugs to treat glutamate overload especially those in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The drugs used for glutamate blocking cause severe side effects and withdrawal symptoms like benzodiazepines, this is not something others with damaged nervous systems want.

How is it that you speak for anyone besides yourself?

I agree with [...], your writing style could use an upgrade to conform with forum policy.

Although our focus is indeed support, members are bound to have questions, will wish to discuss practical issues and problems, and share information. There is no limit upon reasonable discussion, but you should consider how your writing style might affect those reading your words. Since individuals are highly variable in how they react to benzodiazepine use and withdrawal, and some people taking benzodiazepines are more suggestible than they might be under different circumstances, you should avoid making blanket statements.

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2022, 05:53:34 am »
On the surface since glutamate does the opposite of GABA, it seems like blocking glutamate would be a good thing for anxiety and panic sufferers.

OTOH, When you start fooling around with these neurotransmitters in the brain with Rx drugs, you are probably asking for trouble. LOL

Look at what benzos do to GABA after the brain adapts and you become tolerant to the drug's effect. Might the same thing happen using a glutamate blocker? You initially get some relief. Then, the brain adapts to the drug and slowly stops working due to tolerance. Does glutamate then go into overdrive? Yikes-- :o

Interesting thread!

Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Glutamate Blockers
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2022, 08:47:16 am »
On the surface since glutamate does the opposite of GABA, it seems like blocking glutamate would be a good thing for anxiety and panic sufferers.

OTOH, When you start fooling around with these neurotransmitters in the brain with Rx drugs, you are probably asking for trouble. LOL

Look at what benzos do to GABA after the brain adapts and you become tolerant to the drug's effect. Might the same thing happen using a glutamate blocker? You initially get some relief. Then, the brain adapts to the drug and slowly stops working due to tolerance. Does glutamate then go into overdrive? Yikes-- :o

Interesting thread!

Exactly.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.