Author Topic: Heart Palps Support Group  (Read 49627 times)

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2014, 06:02:52 pm »
My pulse skyrocketed briefly during a couple of bike rides (and one walk) yesterday.  They were linked to anxious thoughts.  While I could take down my pulse quickly after realizing that my pulse was high, it would be better for me to avoid those spikes altogether.  On my final ride last night, I practiced deep breathing during the entire ride.  The breathing centered me (if nothing else), and I had no spikes.  Did it again this morning and had no spikes.  I know there's a lot of feedback looping between heart and lungs.  Maybe a steadier breath rate can help me avoid spikes.  I think that I tend to hold my breath at times.  Something (else) to work on, I guess.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2014, 03:46:56 am »
You would not believe the ride I have been on with heart palps (or maybe you guys would).  I can tell you the best thing that has helped me is a group of fb called the magnesium advocacy.  Magnesium glycinate has helped my anxiety and palps.  It took about a month to really feel it.  I take about 700 mg which is equivalent of 5 mg for every lb.  I also do an adrenal cocktail of lemon juice, water, 1 tsp of black strap molasses (for potassium), and celtic sea salt.  In addition to those 2 things I started doing celtic water in the morning and it has really helped with the adrenalin surges.  I'm 9 months out.  I still have lots of problems they come and go thankfully.  The one thing bothering me right now is a fluttering heart palp.  It only does it once in awhile, but when it does it really scares me. 
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2014, 02:20:10 pm »
You would not believe the ride I have been on with heart palps (or maybe you guys would).  I can tell you the best thing that has helped me is a group of fb called the magnesium advocacy.  Magnesium glycinate has helped my anxiety and palps.  It took about a month to really feel it.  I take about 700 mg which is equivalent of 5 mg for every lb.  I also do an adrenal cocktail of lemon juice, water, 1 tsp of black strap molasses (for potassium), and celtic sea salt.  In addition to those 2 things I started doing celtic water in the morning and it has really helped with the adrenalin surges.  I'm 9 months out.  I still have lots of problems they come and go thankfully.  The one thing bothering me right now is a fluttering heart palp.  It only does it once in awhile, but when it does it really scares me.

Is it like a BUMP that comes and goes all day and only lasts a few seconds? I call them heart bumps Iam 90 days out and I still get them. Once in a while I get a good heart palps going on, they scare the hell out of me. It is not fun and is my WORST symptom. Funny how we all exsplain things so different some times it is hard to put in to words how it feels.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2014, 10:07:01 pm »
I just wanted to add my experience with heart pvcs (Thumps.) I started having them a few months out after my Klonopin withdrawal. They took me by surprise because during that time I felt pretty damn good. I was eating well, exercising and felt stable. Developing them really made me spiral mainly because of the fear behind them. (Which has not helped the situation!) I have worn a 24 hour halter monitor which came back normal. I then ended up in the er on an EKG- normal. I finally was put on a 30 day monitor which showed I was having PVC's. I then had a echo and did a stress test. They came to me and said, "We cannot find anything wrong." Which pretty much sums up my entire withdrawal. Lots of medical issues with not problems to be found.

I see a cardiologist that says the same thing I have read a lot post here. "You're fine, [...] not to worry about them." Sorry, but that is impossible. Don't get me wrong I have good days when they don't get me down then others (Like today) where I am very down. But I have to add the thumps/pvcs are a lot less than when they first occurred. I have taken a lot of measures to [...] and get them to cool down and for the most part they are fairly quiet. Except during times of stress and right after my heart rate is up and starts to go down. Like after exercise. I get the thumps when my heart is settling back down.
I was also told my PVCS are stemming from "Adrenaline" bursts.

Be careful about food triggers. (Read up on histamine intolerance) Foods high in histamines increase adrenaline. Smoked foods, salamis, aged meats and cheese are a few of histamine triggering foods. Gluten! If I eat a lot of bread I am guaranteed to have a run of pvcs. Spicy foods, sugars, carbs are all triggers. Not always but for the most part. Again these trigger adrenaline. I have noticed when I am gassy my PVCS are worse. Its as if trapped gas is annoying my vagus nerve and triggers the pvcs. When I ate an almost entirely bland diet I had no pvcs. Of course it is very hard to live like that/this. I don't drink or smoke.

There can be so many reasons why PVCS happen and I have been told over and over that they are benign. It is my gut feeling that my central nervous system is totally whacked from being on Klonopin. I believe that my body is hyper sensitive to everything I ingest, feel, or do. I can only hope that these pvcs settle down as I heal even more. I know it can be other things like hormones, etc. But the bottom line is these started after my withdrawal. When I was on Klonopin I NEVER had these. It is the hardest thing in the world knowing I could take the pill and more than likely these things that have me so down would be gone. But I would have a whole host of other things to contend with. I am trying to be strong but some days I just can't handle it. (Like today.) I will pull out of this I am sure....

Again watch your diet, stress levels, it all matters. Thanks for reading.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2014, 01:06:03 am »
Hi All,

I am posting here because heart issues have been and still are one of my worst symptoms.

I was on Ativan for about 3 months including the 1 month taper. I started having heart issues about 3 weeks prior to jumping and continue to have them.

My heart symptom is an irregular beat that's followed by a pause which feels like a skipped beat followed by a few normal beats and the process repeats. It rarely happens when I sit or lay and happens mostly when I stand up for longer than a few minutes. It's at its worst when I take a shower.  Generally it causes extreme weakness and I often feel like I am going to collaspe.

I had a heart doctor do a full workup last year in April before any of thd benzo drugs. During and after benzos I have been to the ER several times and have seen my GP. All of them say I am fine. The GP did say that the palps are most likely from adrenaline bursts.

My BP and heart rate fluctuates wildly, but the BP stays in the normal range mostly.

I am not sure what's causing this, but it's horrible, and if you have these symptoms, know that you're not alone.

« Last Edit: March 10, 2014, 03:55:18 am by [Buddie] »
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2014, 01:34:29 am »
Heart palps are the WORST symptom of all. Then anxiety. Then all.. LOL.. While mine are getting allot less. They always freak you out and the brain runs wild on the What ifs. CRAZY... Hang on for this hell ride. Last heart pals was about 3 weeks ago. I hope they never return!!!
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2014, 12:29:17 am »
Hi All,

I posted a response to another thread about some interventions for heart "stuff" a while back and thought I'd share it with you here.

Best,

[...]



Hi All,
I have a long history of heart arrhythmias which are now very well managed and I have a few suggestions. Obsid is absolutely correct...Palpitations and Fast Heart Rate (called tachycardia when it is over 100 beats per minute) are two different things. Both seem to be common in w/d. Propranolol or any other beta blocker or calcium channel blocker are used to lower heart rate. You can have palpitations with a normal rate. You would only want to be medicating with these drugs if your rate is over 100 bpm. A palpitation is feeling the heart beat strongly or with a thud, feeling it have a fluttering sensation, feeling skipped beats or beats in your throat, etc. and can occur regardless of rate. A fast heart rate again is one that is over 100 beats per minute and can occur with or without palpitations.

As far as things that you can do to help outside of medication the following have been very helpful for me.

1. Magnesium supplementation

2. Potassium supplementation (You can create a dangerous condition with too much potassium so be careful with this in high doses.) The best way I have found to supplement with this is with 100% Coconut Water. This is very hydrating (dehydration can cause rapid rate and palpitations) and is the richest food source of potassium. Drink it cold.

3. COQ10 The therapeutic dose for heart rhythm is 100-300mg in divided doses daily OR 50-150mg in the ubiquinol form.

4. Taurine The therapeutic dose for heart is 500-1000mg in divided doses daily

5. Hawthorne Solid Extract This helps with the palpitations and rate. It is important to get the right type of formulation. This is a syrup that you mix with water...mix 1/4-1/2 teaspoon in about 1/2 cup of water and drink once per day. I use one by a company called Wise Woman Herbals. It is sold on Amazon as well as retail locations but can be hard to find.

6. Homeopathic Remedies for Palpitations and Rate I have had tremendous success with these taken on an as needed basis. Do not take daily for more than three days due to how homeopathics work. I use two when my rate gets up or I have a lot of palpitations. The first is called Arrhythmia Med and is made by a company called Mediral. I can buy it at my ND's office but it is cheaper online at a site called eVitaminmarket.com. It is only $14.00 per bottle here and it works as well as or better than my prescription meds. The dose is 10 drops under the tongue up to 3 times per day. Also, I have equally great results with another one called Cardio Liquitrophic. I get it on the same site and I take 1/2 teaspoon under the tongue up to 3 times per day as needed...again, with both of these for up to 3 days consecutively. I use this if I need additional support after taking the Arrhythmia Med. I think that most here will not need both.

7. Breathing Exercises The 4-7-8 Breath. Don't dismiss this because it seems too simple. I have used this breathing technique with tremendous success. If anything it really helps stop a panic attack in its tracks which certainly helps. Here are the instructions from Dr. Andrew Weil's site:

This exercise is utterly simple, takes almost no time, requires no equipment and can be done anywhere. Although you can do the exercise in any position, sit with your back straight while learning the exercise. Place the tip of your tongue against the ridge of tissue just behind your upper front teeth, and keep it there through the entire exercise. You will be exhaling through your mouth around your tongue; [...] pursing your lips slightly if this seems awkward.

*Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.
*Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.
*Hold your breath for a count of seven.
*Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.
*This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.
Note that you always inhale quietly through your nose and exhale audibly through your mouth. The tip of your tongue stays in position the whole time. Exhalation takes twice as long as inhalation. The absolute time you spend on each phase is not important; the ratio of 4:7:8 is important. If you have trouble holding your breath, speed the exercise up but keep to the ratio of 4:7:8 for the three phases. With practice you can slow it all down and get used to inhaling and exhaling more and more deeply.

This exercise is a natural tranquilizer for the nervous system. Unlike tranquilizing drugs, which are often effective when you first take them but then lose their power over time, this exercise is subtle when you first [...] it but gains in power with repetition and practice. Do it at least twice a day. You cannot do it too frequently. Do not do more than four breaths at one time for the first month of practice. Later, if you wish, you can extend it to eight breaths. If you feel a little lightheaded when you first breathe this way, do not be concerned; it will pass.

Once you develop this technique by practicing it every day, it will be a very useful tool that you will always have with you. Use it whenever anything upsetting happens - before you react. Use it whenever you are aware of internal tension. Use it to help you fall asleep. This exercise cannot be recommended too highly. Everyone can benefit from it.

8. Vagal Maneuvers Vagal Maneuvers are a way to stop a very rapid heart rate. You need to be careful with these and it is advisable to have a trained professional show you how to do them correctly. These would be for a fast rate only not for palpitations alone. That said these are pretty safe and the three easiest to do are-
1. Bearing down-this is where you hold your breath and bear down as if you were having a bowel movement. This is called a Valsalva Maneuver and can be very effective without much risk.
2. Coughing or gagging-if your rate gets high you can [...] coughing or gagging to drop the it.
3. Immersing your face in ice cold water-this is the Diving Reflex. You can fill the sink or a basin with ice water and immerse your face in it for as long as you can stand and repeat a few times. This isn't pleasant but sure beats a racing heart if it works.

I really hope that these suggestions help. Let me know if you have questions on any of this, I'm [...] to help where I can!
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #27 on: March 11, 2014, 02:39:59 am »
Thanks [...] for posting all that!!!! Great information awesone!!!
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #28 on: March 11, 2014, 03:02:45 am »
Hi All,

I posted a response to another thread about some interventions for heart "stuff" a while back and thought I'd share it with you here.

Best,

[...]



Hi All,
I have a long history of heart arrhythmias which are now very well managed and I have a few suggestions. Obsid is absolutely correct...Palpitations and Fast Heart Rate (called tachycardia when it is over 100 beats per minute) are two different things. Both seem to be common in w/d. Propranolol or any other beta blocker or calcium channel blocker are used to lower heart rate. You can have palpitations with a normal rate. You would only want to be medicating with these drugs if your rate is over 100 bpm. A palpitation is feeling the heart beat strongly or with a thud, feeling it have a fluttering sensation, feeling skipped beats or beats in your throat, etc. and can occur regardless of rate. A fast heart rate again is one that is over 100 beats per minute and can occur with or without palpitations.

As far as things that you can do to help outside of medication the following have been very helpful for me.

1. Magnesium supplementation

2. Potassium supplementation (You can create a dangerous condition with too much potassium so be careful with this in high doses.) The best way I have found to supplement with this is with 100% Coconut Water. This is very hydrating (dehydration can cause rapid rate and palpitations) and is the richest food source of potassium. Drink it cold.

3. COQ10 The therapeutic dose for heart rhythm is 100-300mg in divided doses daily OR 50-150mg in the ubiquinol form.

4. Taurine The therapeutic dose for heart is 500-1000mg in divided doses daily

5. Hawthorne Solid Extract This helps with the palpitations and rate. It is important to get the right type of formulation. This is a syrup that you mix with water...mix 1/4-1/2 teaspoon in about 1/2 cup of water and drink once per day. I use one by a company called Wise Woman Herbals. It is sold on Amazon as well as retail locations but can be hard to find.

6. Homeopathic Remedies for Palpitations and Rate I have had tremendous success with these taken on an as needed basis. Do not take daily for more than three days due to how homeopathics work. I use two when my rate gets up or I have a lot of palpitations. The first is called Arrhythmia Med and is made by a company called Mediral. I can buy it at my ND's office but it is cheaper online at a site called eVitaminmarket.com. It is only $14.00 per bottle here and it works as well as or better than my prescription meds. The dose is 10 drops under the tongue up to 3 times per day. Also, I have equally great results with another one called Cardio Liquitrophic. I get it on the same site and I take 1/2 teaspoon under the tongue up to 3 times per day as needed...again, with both of these for up to 3 days consecutively. I use this if I need additional support after taking the Arrhythmia Med. I think that most here will not need both.

7. Breathing Exercises The 4-7-8 Breath. Don't dismiss this because it seems too simple. I have used this breathing technique with tremendous success. If anything it really helps stop a panic attack in its tracks which certainly helps. Here are the instructions from Dr. Andrew Weil's site:

This exercise is utterly simple, takes almost no time, requires no equipment and can be done anywhere. Although you can do the exercise in any position, sit with your back straight while learning the exercise. Place the tip of your tongue against the ridge of tissue just behind your upper front teeth, and keep it there through the entire exercise. You will be exhaling through your mouth around your tongue; [...] pursing your lips slightly if this seems awkward.

*Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.
*Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.
*Hold your breath for a count of seven.
*Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.
*This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.
Note that you always inhale quietly through your nose and exhale audibly through your mouth. The tip of your tongue stays in position the whole time. Exhalation takes twice as long as inhalation. The absolute time you spend on each phase is not important; the ratio of 4:7:8 is important. If you have trouble holding your breath, speed the exercise up but keep to the ratio of 4:7:8 for the three phases. With practice you can slow it all down and get used to inhaling and exhaling more and more deeply.

This exercise is a natural tranquilizer for the nervous system. Unlike tranquilizing drugs, which are often effective when you first take them but then lose their power over time, this exercise is subtle when you first [...] it but gains in power with repetition and practice. Do it at least twice a day. You cannot do it too frequently. Do not do more than four breaths at one time for the first month of practice. Later, if you wish, you can extend it to eight breaths. If you feel a little lightheaded when you first breathe this way, do not be concerned; it will pass.

Once you develop this technique by practicing it every day, it will be a very useful tool that you will always have with you. Use it whenever anything upsetting happens - before you react. Use it whenever you are aware of internal tension. Use it to help you fall asleep. This exercise cannot be recommended too highly. Everyone can benefit from it.

8. Vagal Maneuvers Vagal Maneuvers are a way to stop a very rapid heart rate. You need to be careful with these and it is advisable to have a trained professional show you how to do them correctly. These would be for a fast rate only not for palpitations alone. That said these are pretty safe and the three easiest to do are-
1. Bearing down-this is where you hold your breath and bear down as if you were having a bowel movement. This is called a Valsalva Maneuver and can be very effective without much risk.
2. Coughing or gagging-if your rate gets high you can [...] coughing or gagging to drop the it.
3. Immersing your face in ice cold water-this is the Diving Reflex. You can fill the sink or a basin with ice water and immerse your face in it for as long as you can stand and repeat a few times. This isn't pleasant but sure beats a racing heart if it works.

I really hope that these suggestions help. Let me know if you have questions on any of this, I'm [...] to help where I can!

That was a great post [...]  :smitten:
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Heart Palps Support Group
« Reply #29 on: March 11, 2014, 05:07:50 am »
Glad it was helpful. I've struggled with this for a long time and this is the culmination of 10 years of trial and error!

 :smitten:

[...]
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.