Author Topic: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression  (Read 355 times)

[Buddie]

Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« on: August 07, 2022, 03:12:00 pm »
Study indicating garlic's anti-depressant-like effect:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792615/
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[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2022, 08:38:12 pm »
Hi [...],

Do you take a peeled garlic daily? 

I started taking a peeled garlic starting today. I figured it couldnít hurt.  My depression is really bad.
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[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2022, 10:46:09 pm »
Hi [...],

Do you take a peeled garlic daily? 

I started taking a peeled garlic starting today. I figured it couldnít hurt.  My depression is really bad.

I haven't tried one recently, but I think I just might do so.  At least it will keep the vampires away :-).
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2022, 12:41:49 pm »
Your so funny 😆

So the article with the findings on garlic helping mice with depression isnít true? I skimmed through it but thought it was interesting.

I hate the garlic aftertaste.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2022, 01:52:22 pm »
Your so funny 😆

So the article with the findings on garlic helping mice with depression isnít true? I skimmed through it but thought it was interesting.

I hate the garlic aftertaste.
No, the article is true. I was just adding a little Halloween humor.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2022, 02:23:23 pm »
ohhhhhhh, im super slow... and the klonopin made everything worse lol  :thumbsup:

  I will continue taking my peeled garlic.  garlic breath it is .

thanks RR
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2022, 02:28:01 pm »
For interested readers, here is the full title and abstract for this 2008 study conducted with Swiss albino mice.  Note the Ďdosesí of ethanolic extract used per kilogram.

Title

Evidences for the involvement of monoaminergic and GABAergic systems in antidepressant-like activity of garlic extract in mice

Abstract

Objectives: The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the ethanolic extract of Allium sativum L. (Family: Lilliaceae), commonly known as garlic, on depression in mice.

Materials and methods: Ethanolic extract of garlic (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) was administered orally for 14 successive days to young Swiss albino mice of either sex and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated employing tail suspension test (TST) and forced swim test (FST). The efficacy of the extract was compared with standard antidepressant drugs like fluoxetine and imipramine. The mechanism of action of the extract was investigated by co-administration of prazosin (alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist), sulpiride (selective D2-receptor antagonist), baclofen (GABA(B) agonist) and p-CPA (serotonin antagonist) separately with the extract and by studying the effect of the extract on brain MAO-A and MAO-B levels.

Results: Garlic extract (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner in both TST and FST, indicating significant antidepressant-like activity. The efficacy of the extract was found to be comparable to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg p.o.) and imipramine (15 mg/kg p.o.) in both TST and FST. The extract did not show any significant effect on the locomotor activity of the mice. Prazosin, sulpiride, baclofen and p-CPA significantly attenuated the extract-induced antidepressant-like effect in TST. Garlic extract (100 mg/kg) administered orally for 14 successive days significantly decreased brain MAO-A and MAO-B levels, as compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Garlic extract showed significant antidepressant-like activity probably by inhibiting MAO-A and MAO-B levels and through interaction with adrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic and GABAergic systems.
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[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2022, 02:55:52 pm »
Hi RR, and [...],

Iíve been taking peeled organic garlic but how much do I have to take again for it to be effective?
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2022, 05:33:19 pm »
Hello, [...].  Please bear in mind that:

(1) This study was conducted with Swiss albino mice. Results from animal studies do not always generalize to humans.

(2) The Ďtreatmentí was an ethanol-based garlic extract not peeled garlic cloves. 

(3) The effects measured (decreased immobility time in the mice) were observed at a dose of 100mg of extract per 1 kilogram of weight.  One kilogram is about 2.2 pounds.  So a Ďmouseí weighing 120 pounds would have been given about 5,455mg of the extract.
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.

[Buddie]

Re: Research on Garlic's Effect on Depression
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2022, 08:09:33 pm »
Wow thatís a lot of garlic extract.  Iím going to continue my peeled garlic 🧄  because it helps with blood pressure and Iím sure other things and it wonít hurt.

Thank you for explaining things to me in a way I can understand.  I havenít laughed all day until now, thank you for that.

♥️😘
Suggestions, opinions and/or advice provided by the author of this post should not be regarded as medical advice; nor should it substitute for professional medical care. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Please read our Community Policy Documents board for further information.